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24 Responses

  1. Dear Glenn,
    hopefully you don't lose the spirit to continue. We, Amazon Fund do our best. Just yesterday 28 Dutch Indigenous Rights NGO's had a meeting and decided to combine forces to support Indigenous people, who can be seen as the keepers of our rainforests.
    For 2016, when the Olympics are held in Brazil, http://www.amazonfund.eu/olympic_brazil.html we have a big campaign planned. Hopefully you and many others will join this campaign.
    Best wishes,
    Fred Opdam
    Chairman Amazon Fund (eu)

  2. Emily Fano says:

    Fantastic essay Dr Barry. You are completely correct. And the movie
    Avatar brings this point home beautifully. I bet movie director James
    Cameron could buy protection for much of the world's rainforests if he
    wanted to by paying local governments to protect them. I would be
    curious to know what you think of Prince Charles's efforts?? Is there
    any forest protection organization anywhere in the world that is
    trying to do as you suggest? What about Sting's Rainforest Foundation?
    Haven't they advocated working with local peoples for many years?
    Best,
    Emily Fano
    New York City

  3. Jonathan R Cort says:

    EXCELLENT Feature! and underlining a CRITICAL renewed urgency for New Paradigms to make Forest Conservation much more effective than what is afforded by the current Movement. Inspiration for us at HEP to slide our Nepalese Forest Protection Action Initiative up the Projects priority list! Will be on the ground in Nepal next week so will be able to explore and analyse the most effective model via a Needs Analysis next week!
    Thank you for this!

  4. Iona says:

    Good one, Glen. But super sad. I'll try to run it next time.
    Iona

  5. John Prentice says:

    Hello Dr. Glen Barry thank you for your stewardship in the tropical rainforests.
    I support you 100% and I too ! am fighting the Liberal govt in B.C. ,to stop liquidating the cedar and old growth forest in B.C., especially on Vancouver island, and recently joined a new group called the “Ancient Rainforest Alliance.” to protect the last remaining old growth Coastal Temperate Rainforest
    left on the island, between 80 -90 % of this forest type has been lost and it is sad, that all the other old growth dependant species will have to move on, or be lost too!
    Thanks for your, efforts! and i wish you all the success in this new year.!
    sincerely yours: John Prentice
    P.S. we have a good thing in common! i too have been an environmental activists and conservationists for 25 plus years, my dad instilled in my heart at a early age from all or wilderness car camping trips in my youth, the appreciation for our wilderness, intact in the whole.

  6. Kathnry says:

    Sorry. Lost my job–outsourced. However, please include me when you want a signature to help save “old forests”. I read your lengthy and elaborate essay–Bravo! So true! Best to you, Kathryn

  7. Greg Jalbert says:

    The Role of Sacramental Plants in Sustainable Communities in the Western Amazon


    Presented by Paulo Roberto Silva e Souza.
    The Amazon rainforest is an ancient and highly diverse ecosystem that provides essential benefits for our entire planet and everything that lives on it, breathes air and depends on water. This ecosystem is being destroyed and its existence is being threatened by unthinking greed in the form of cattle ranchers, the agriculture industry, logging, and the infrastructure required for these encroachments. The talk tells the stories of three communities living in the forest in sustainable ways as stewards with respect and emerging understanding of natures principles using the spiritual teachings transmitted through the use of sacramental plants: the Yawanawa tribe and the Santo Daime communities in Ceu do Mapia and Ceu do Mar. The common thread through the talk is the necessity for the social expansion of environmental consciousness and the ways that this can be facilitated in the minds and hearts of people living in the style of the Western World with its focus on acquisition and domination.

  8. Richard says:

    “Another example is the dramatic restoration of denuded rainforest in Borneo after only six years: "Planting finishes this year [2008], but already [Willie] Smits [the Indonesian forestry expert who led the replanting] and his team from the Borneo Orangutan Survival Foundation charity claim the forest is

  9. Definitely rainforest ecological restoration is possible and desirable. Alghout yu have a diminished forest genetically, biodiversity, and ecosystems; what you can do is essentially speed up natural succession, to get many of the canopy species which are important. A MAJOR influence on success is the adjacency and connectivity of protected forests as seed and wildlife sources. I am very well-versed on this topic, and am trying to make it part of the “protect and RESTORE old forests” message because we have already lost more than we can afford too.
    gb

  10. Georgina says:

    Glen, what you write is chilling. In spite of all the education on the horrors of rainforest destruction ….it continues.
    I suppose all politics is local. I wish there was a way to lead and implement a change in consciousness regarding monies being made from rainforests whether end products or farms. We do not learn from history and we are disconnected from the National Geographic view of the forests and putting decking in your back yard.
    Oy!!! What do you suggest. Its an existential crisis; knowing and doing. The whole culture of addiction to rainforest wood has to be changed……
    You, for one, have been doing yoeman's work. Without your efforts and a handful of people in the movement it would all be over for the forests.
    Thank you and I will keep doing whatever I can do in my own small part of the world.
    In solidarity,
    georgina

  11. Greer says:

    Dear Dr Barry – once again you have hit the nail on the head. The world has been deceived by people who have no appreciation or knowledge of what constitutes a rainforest and it has taken to “make” one. Politicians have no idea what an ancient woodland when they see one in Britain! It has taken and still does take us, a lot of effort to save even a small woodland of great diversity here. How can we hope to save a whole rainforest when the politicians elsewhere are as dumb.
    Can you name those organisations who are out-of-touch with reality? I support Word Land Trust and the project in Sumatra that the British RSPB is undertaking (Harapan) and the WWF Heart of Borneo one.
    Greer Hart, Glasgow Scotland – the Scottish Tree Trust

  12. Matt Clowes says:

    Hi Glenn,
    The following part of your piece stood out to me.
    “That's why I and others think it is so important that the forest/environment/climate/ecological sustainability movement commit itself to ending primary forest logging and protecting and restoring old forests.”
    I would just like to make a couple of points on this. Firstly, and most importantly, I think that it is vital that all of us who consider ourselves to be part of the growing global environmental movement, see the issue of the devastating effects of human behaviour on the natural integrity of the earth, in a properly holistic way, whilst taking into account all those identifiable areas that make up the whole.
    Ocean acidification caused by sulpher emissions from coal firewd power stations is threating planckton development, and thus the whole marine ecosystem which is also the basis of all life on land. In addition this sulpher is rained onto forests causing terrible damage to them.
    The growing of soy is a major cause of deforestation, ninety seven percent of this soy grown as animal feed and not for human consumption. Tree farms also devastate old growth forests for food additives and energy provision.
    All these things I know that you know. So what really is the issue for us? Is it any one of these issues, or the causes of them all? I would say the latter. If we can tackle the causes, we can affect the consequences. But we must do this as an increasingly recognisable global movement of activists for the earth.
    My current area of activity is persuading the global environmental movement of the paramount necessity of moving to a vegan diet. To reduce GHG emissions, (it is now thought that as much as fifty one percent of these emissions are caused by the livestock industry who “process” fifty five billion animals a year) and to maintain integrity as activists. This is not a cruelty issue except for those who wish to address it that way, it is an issue of life and death for the planet, affecting deforestation, water depletion and degradation, GHG emissions and much else besides. It is also not a personal comment as I have no idea of your views on this issue.
    To sum up, all the issues we address are part of one and the same thing. We must work together as well as separately, and recognise our common identities as activists for the earth. Only in this way have we a chance of succeeding.
    Best Wishes,
    Matt Clowes
    http://www.veganfortheearth.net

  13. Frida Inta says:

    Hello,
    In New Zealand, Native Forest Action are very proud of the fact that logging
    of old growth forest on Crown land was stopped completely in the 1990s
    (thanks to a hard and long campaign). The region that the logging was
    occurring in was paid out by the government to the tune of $92 000 000.
    Certification of old growth logging is better than illegal logging, but
    Native Frorest Action (New Zealand) and supporters acknowledge that it is
    not ideal, and that illegal logs get through as well.
    The Greens Party in NZ have been working to ensure that all old growth
    timber (especially qwila for outdoor furniture and decking) comes from
    certified sources. Maybe after that, pressure can be laid to end old growth
    logging completely – ride on that day! Public perception has to change too
    though – getting too much change all at once begs for a complete
    turn-around, losing all that campaigns have ever put into place. The grass
    roots level is one of the most important places, where interaction with
    friends, and friends of friends, spreads the word that using old growth
    timber in chique outdoor settings is not on.
    Cheers,
    Frida Inta,
    Seddonville,
    Buller,
    West Coast,
    South Island,
    New Zealand.

  14. rob says:

    right on!
    working to help contribute to such a movement (adequate to the need for an end-game).
    rob

  15. Veronica Martin says:

    Glen, have you ever thought about all the amazing work you could get done if you spent the same amount of time targeting the people destroying the rainforests as you do the people trying to save them?

  16. Anonymous says:

    Dear dr. Barry,
    What you write is really inspiring and I genuinely have a lot of respect for what you're doing. It's sad to see that not everybody is like-minded. Imagine the world when that would be the case.
    Best wishes.

  17. Marc says:

    Very nice essay, a true eye-opener. It seems that their are hundreds of activist groups yet their inspiring work comes up short time after time. I hope the future proves you wrong Dr. Barry…

  18. Thomas says:

    Great blog, we need to do more things like this on a global level. If anyone is interested in Jobs in this area see http://www.cleantechjobs.de

  19. Georgina says:

    Glen, what you write is chilling. In spite of all the education on the horrors of rainforest destruction ….it continues.
    I suppose all politics is local. I wish there was a way to lead and implement a change in consciousness regarding monies being made from rainforests whether end products or farms. We do not learn from history and we are disconnected from the National Geographic view of the forests and putting decking in your back yard.
    Oy!!! What do you suggest. Its an existential crisis; knowing and doing. The whole culture of addiction to rainforest wood has to be changed……
    You, for one, have been doing yoeman's work. Without your efforts and a handful of people in the movement it would all be over for the forests.
    Thank you and I will keep doing whatever I can do in my own small part of the world.
    In solidarity,
    georgina

  20. Dave says:

    Glen,
    Well put.
    These companies trying to push “sustainable logging” are so far beyond an ecologically aware mindset. I'm sure they don't realize, or care to hear, that damn near all logging is unsustainable – at least as it is currently practiced for the sake of greed.
    Your message reaches me loud and clear. I agree it is beyond ignorance to cut 500 year old trees down and stamp them with a sustainable label. I'm glad to see you call it out for the scam it is.
    As for the new tactics to fight deforestation…? I'll be thinking about that too.
    Dave

  21. Sam says:

    Dear Dr. Berry,
    I'm a student in an environmental monitoring/conservation mentoring program. I'm thrilled with your efforts and completely agree with you. Our rainforests are where Earth gets a significant amount of oxygen, and without oxygen, Earth in a sense will die. Our worldly addictions to exotic woods need to cease. Loggers log and fail to replant, thus, rainforests around the world are being diminished to mere farmland. Your message is concise and I agree that cutting down old forests is beyond ignorance.
    Despite all the educational programs, such as “Life” on Discovery, showing the rich and vast diversity of rainforests and their delicate ecosystems, destruction sadly still continues.

  22. Meghan says:

    Hi Dr. Berry, I am at a bit of a loss as to who to support that will be the most effective out of the given options. I would like to help funnel donations to a group, but how can I really know which is working? It seems like you are saying none of them are, but do you have any suggestions? I don't want to give up at this impasse…
    Thanks:)

  23. Sonya McCarthy says:

    Help save our old forest growth in Whistler BC.
    Our Muncipality of Whistler BC has agreed to have old growth forest cut in Sept 9th 2010. They change the date because they have no permits but all the artea is being cut so we have no recourse.to have a say please help Whistler save the forest send your emails to the above email so we can let our Muncipality know it is not what the people want.

  24. Valerie Degnan says:

    Dear Dr. Barry,
    I am a senior interior design student who happens to be doing my thesis on alternative strategies to save the rainforests. I can understand your frustration , but please do not give up. First, I wanted to say that prior to choosing this topic for my thesis, I actually thought the rainforests were doing well. I mean, all of the years of effort, and certainly the world wasn't “stupid enough” to allow their demise. I am so disappointed to see I was incorrect and in many ways I feel duped… Here we are in America “going green” Everyone is slapping “green” on their product and often charging more for it, but what good are we really doing.
    Well, in my thesis I will be making some proposals that may be able to make a difference if they could be implemented. They are different because they play the “money card” to beat everyone who doesn't care at their own game, I am sad to report that I think that is our most viable hope. I will be happy to share my proposals with you as I progress with my work, and I would welcome your expert feedback along the way so that I can “get this right”
    Again, wait for your second wind, and don't give up. If one thing doesn't work then we will find something else that does.
    Regards,
    Valerie Degnan

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