End Old-Growth Woodchip Market in Tasmania and the World

TAKE ACTION
Tell Nippon Paper Group to Stop Buying Old-Growth
Comment Form: http://www.np-g.com/e/csr/ideology/materials_form.html
Background: http://www.np-g.com/e/news/news05061701.html
Japanese company Nippon Paper Group is following the lead of a key rival by reviewing its policy for purchasing woodchips from old growth forests. Nippon is the latest customer of Tasmanian exporter Gunns Ltd to consider new policies after Mitsubishi Paper Mill moved to reject woodchips derived from Tasmania, Australia's old growth and high-conservation value forests late last month. The Earth's forest conservation movement has a unique opportunity to follow up upon our recent victory in Tasmania ? taking the next step to transition the paper industry to a No Old-Growth stance. Nippon is carrying out a public consultation on their raw materials policy which would provide the opportunity it needs to follow the lead of Mitsubishi and dump Tasmanian old growth woodchips. Comments are being taken only through a form on their web site, where they ask for the “Main Point” and “Reason or Background” in regard to their raw materials procurement policy. Below are suggestions for the basic message we should be trying to communicate, which you can copy and paste, but please add your own language if possible.


Provide comments before July 19th on Behalf of Tasmanian Old-Growth at:
http://www.np-g.com/e/csr/ideology/materials_form.html
Main Point:
I am very upset that Nippon is still buying woodchips sourced from the old growth forests of Tasmania. Nippon should immediately stop buying woodchips sourced from all old growth and other high conservation value forests. To keep up with your competitor Mitsubishi, you must adopt a no old-growth forests use policy.
Reason or Background
A broad global consensus has emerged that industrial logging of old-growth, and other endangered forests, is antiquated and no longer acceptable. Ancient forests are required to maintain local as well as global ecological sustainability. Industrial development of Tasmanian and other endangered forests irrevocably diminishes them. To protect the Earth and all her life, the world's remaining old-growth must be protected from commercial scale development. World Heritage-class Tasmanian and other old-growth forests should not be fodder for woodchips. Businesses that fail to heed this message will feel the pain of market rejection.

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4 Responses

  1. julian wansink says:

    Main Point:
    I am very upset that Nippon is still buying woodchips sourced from the old growth forests of Tasmania. Nippon should immediately stop buying woodchips sourced from all old growth and other high conservation value forests. To keep up with your competitor Mitsubishi, you must adopt a no old-growth forests use policy.
    Reason or Background
    A broad global consensus has emerged that industrial logging of old-growth, and other endangered forests, is antiquated and no longer acceptable. Ancient forests are required to maintain local as well as global ecological sustainability. Industrial development of Tasmanian and other endangered forests irrevocably diminishes them. To protect the Earth and all her life, the world's remaining old-growth must be protected from commercial scale development. World Heritage-class Tasmanian and other old-growth forests should not be fodder for woodchips. Businesses that fail to heed this message will feel the pain of market rejection.

  2. Kevin Target says:

    Human Survival is now in the balance. We have used up most of the oil now: How long will we have enough Oxygen? Most of the trees are gone. 20 to 50 years on this is likely to be the reality.
    The Battle to win or lose this survival issue is NOW. It is a battle fought in the worlds cultural attitudes, and in what these many peoples (and companies) of the world percieve as acceptable and NOT acceptable.
    Your decision to end imports of wood chip from native forests, would be a powerful marker in the arguement FOR conservation of forests.
    The Wood Chip industry in Tasmania is totally destructive of native original forest ( they leave almost nothing ) , and a clear case of “Commercial Imperialism” of another continents biological resource. And I am very upset that Nippon is still buying woodchips sourced from the old growth forests of Tasmania. I frequently visit Tasmania, as my parents live in the north of the island, and I am an Australian. I have witnesed the destruction over several years. Nippon should immediately stop buying woodchips sourced from all old growth and other high conservation value forests in Tasmania and ELSEWHERE . To keep up with your competitor Mitsubishi, you must adopt a NO old-growth forests use policy. Plant and harvest your OWN sustainable forests IN JAPAN. You will save the transport costs AND the forests of Tasmania, (which are very much more fragile than even many Australians realize).
    “A broad global consensus has emerged that industrial logging of old-growth, and other endangered forests, is antiquated and no longer acceptable. Ancient forests are required to maintain local as well as global ecological sustainability. Industrial development of Tasmanian and other endangered forests irrevocably diminishes them”. This is all grand talk…the reality is so much simpler.: Lose most of the trees and die.
    Nigeria is a classic case. Vast logging operations have been going on here for years, plus de-forestation for agriculture, and fuel. The result is a badly degraded canopy, with huge areas of secondary undergrowth, of different species, which do NOT have the same protective environment for the fauna. ( Nor do they protect the soil under harsh tropical rain. )
    This has been one of the principal causes for the demise of all wildlife in the bush. A proliferation of local wars, and the local habit of regarding wildlife as lunch have also had a major impact. But the sad fact is that although I have travelled widely in the bush, in some fairly remote locations in some of the southern States of Nigeria, I have seen NO wildlife AT ALL, except for a couple of sightings of tropical birds.
    This has been the case over the last few years. Nigeia used to be noted for its wildlife 40 years ago.
    To protect the Earth and all her life, the world's remaining old-growth must be protected from commercial scale development. World Heritage-class Tasmanian and other old-growth forests should not be fodder for woodchips. Businesses that fail to heed this message will feel the pain of market rejection.
    But a decision to end imports of wood chip from indigenous forests, would be much bigger and more significant than just the Tasmanian issue. It would put your group in the forefront; leading the debate to change cultural attitudes FOR SUSTAINABLE use of resources. Companies have a huge role and responsibility to play here, as by their very size they command more attention. The survival debate HAS to be carried BY companies, as the organizations with enough clout commercially to MAKE things change. You will be LEADING opinion in an ESSENTIAL, critical PRO SURVIVAL debate.
    This is a very strong Commercial Marketing Image to be advertising.

  3. Karen Riley says:

    Thank you so much for this great web site. I just sent off my comments to Nippon Paper. As somebody who lived in Japan forever, I tried to hit home on what I understand to be cultural sensitivities regarding business image issues. I think negative international opinion matters very much to large Japanese corporations, and the more outside voices that repond to this, the better. I want to feel optimistic that Nippon Paper, with this kind of pressure, will follow suit.

  4. Tom compas says:

    I live in Adelaide but
    I'm really concerned about
    the trees in Tasmania.
    What can I do?
    I'm 9 years old but
    I'll understand about
    anything.

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